Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/235700
Authors: 
Hajdu, Tamás
Hajdu, Gábor
Year of Publication: 
2021
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper No. 896
Abstract: 
This chapter reviews the empirical literature on the impacts of temperature and climate change on human pregnancies. The focus is on the quasi-experimental studies that use panel data, apply a fixed effect approach, and exploit the random year-to-year fluctuation in temperature. The insights that emerge from the review highlight that exposure to heat in the pre-conception period has detrimental impacts on fertility. In addition, heat during pregnancy increases pregnancy losses, leads to a reduction in gestational length, and lowers birth weight. Despite the growing empirical evidence on the subject, understanding the relationship between temperature and pregnancy-related outcomes is far from perfect. Importantly, the potential impacts of climate change are rarely quantified. The chapter outlines directions for future research.
Subjects: 
temperature
climate change
fertility
pregnancy
health at birth
birth weight
pregnancy loss
JEL: 
J13
Q54
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.