Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/173751
Authors: 
Jauer, Julia
Liebig, Thomas
Martin, John P.
Puhani, Patrick A.
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper 178
Abstract: 
We estimate whether migration can be an equilibrating force in the labour market by comparing pre- and post-crisis migration movements at the regional level in both Europe and the United States, and their association with asymmetric labour market shocks. Based on fixed-effects regressions using regional panel data, we find that Europe’s migratory response to unemployment shocks was almost identical to that recorded in the United States after the crisis. Our estimates suggest that, if all measured population changes in Europe were due to migration for employment purposes – i.e. an upper-bound estimate – up to about a quarter of the asymmetric labour market shock would be absorbed by migration within a year. However, in Europe and especially in the Eurozone, the reaction to a very large extent stems from migration of recent EU accession country citizens as well as of third-country nationals.
Subjects: 
free mobility
migration
economic crisis
labour market adjustment
Eurozone
Europe
United States
JEL: 
F15
F22
J61
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.