Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/170572
Authors: 
Krafft, Caroline
Elbadawy, Asmaa
Sieverding, Maia
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper 134
Abstract: 
This paper examines patterns of school choice in Egypt from primary through higher education. We use a mixed-methods approach that combines survey data with qualitative in-depth interviews to explore schooling decisions. Some private and religious schools exist, but we find that in most geographic areas school “choice” at the pre-university level is effectively limited to public schools—despite their inadequate quality. Although there has not been much change in the attendance of private schools at the pre-university level, we find that attendance of private higher education institutions has increased over time. Azhari (Islamic religious) school attendance at the pre-university level has increased over time as well, possibly indicating a reaction to the low quality of public schools. Overall, when choices are available, families still tend to prefer public schools due to their low cost, though private and religious schools are generally perceived to be of higher quality.
Subjects: 
education
school choice
private schooling
religious education
inequality of opportunity
Egypt
JEL: 
I21
I22
I23
I24
N35
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.