Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/82172
Authors: 
Forslund, Anders
Lindh, Thomas
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, IFAU - Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation 2004:3
Abstract: 
Swedish unemployment was very low up to the early 1990s when it rose rapidly. At the same time manufacturing employment fell by more than 20 %. The decentralisation of wage bargaining that started in 1983 may have contributed to this by making employment more shock sensitive or by increasing wage mark-ups. In Swedish plant-level data for manufacturing 1970–96 relatively less employment is in low-productivity plants after decentralisation than before, but the correlation between industry wage costs and productivity becomes stronger. Our conclusion is that decentralisation of bargaining in Sweden has not allowed more low-productivity plants in manufacturing to survive. On the contrary, the evidence indicates that a higher wage mark-up may have resulted from the decentralisation. This would weed out low-productivity plants and decrease manufacturing employment.
Subjects: 
Manufacturing employment
bargaining institutions
industry structure
JEL: 
E24
J31
L60
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
868.25 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.