Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/81051
Authors: 
Bratton, Michael
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
WIDER Working Paper 2013/023
Abstract: 
In examining the study of government performance, this paper asks whether field experiments can improve the explanatory precision of results generated by public opinion surveys. Survey research on basic health and education services sub-Saharan Africa shows that the perceived 'user friendliness' (or ease of use) of services drives popular evaluations of government performance. For the reliable attribution of causality, however, surveys and field experiments, combined in a variety of mixed research designs, are more rigorous and reliable than either method alone. The paper proposes a menu of such designs.
Subjects: 
government performance
surveys
experiments
health
education
Africa
JEL: 
H4
I00
I18
I25
ISBN: 
978-92-9230-600-7
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
548.68 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.