Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80114
Authors: 
Iliev, Peter
Putterman, Louis
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Brown University, Department of Economics 2005-04
Abstract: 
It has been shown, for non-Communist developed and developing countries, that earlier development of agriculture, a dense population, and a state-level polity is associated with a higher income and more rapid economic growth in the late 20th Century. We investigate whether this was also the case for countries under Communism and for the same countries in transition to a market economy. Our findings are generally affirmative, with an interesting pattern for the Eurasian socialist core countries involving higher growth nearer their west European and east Asian poles. We also find that ethnic fractionalization, which is correlated with late pre-modern development, shows harmful effects in the transition era but not under Communism.
Subjects: 
economic growth
transition
Communism
history
ethnic fractionalization
JEL: 
P27
N10
O40
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
994.41 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.