Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/46477
Authors: 
Hoel, Michael
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo working paper: Energy and climate economics 3168
Abstract: 
A sufficiently rapidly rising carbon tax may increase near-term emissions compared with the case of no carbon tax. Even so, such a carbon tax path may reduce total costs related to climate change, since the tax may reduce total carbon extraction. A government cannot commit to a specific carbon tax rate in the distant future. For reasonable assumptions about expectation formation, a higher present carbon tax will reduce near-term carbon emissions. Moreover, whatever the expectations about future tax rates are, near-term emissions will decline for a sufficiently high carbon tax. However, if the near-term tax rate for some reason is set below its optimal level, increased concern for the climate may change taxes in a manner that increases near-term emissions.
Subjects: 
climate change
exhaustible resources
green paradox
carbon tax
JEL: 
Q31
Q38
Q41
Q48
Q54
Q58
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
239.95 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.