Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31661
Authors: 
Kongar, Ebru
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
Working papers // The Levy Economics Institute 436
Abstract: 
This study investigates the impact of increased import competition on gender wage and employment differentials in U.S. manufacturing over the period from 1976 to 1993. Increased import competition is expected to decrease the relative demand for workers in low-wage production occupations and the relative demand for women workers, given the high female share in these occupations. The findings support this hypothesis. Disproportionate job losses for women in low-wage production occupations was associated with rising imports in U.S. manufacturing over this period, and as low-wage women lost their jobs, the average wage of the remaining women in the study increased, thereby narrowing the gender wage gap.
Subjects: 
gender wage gap
discrimination
international trade
U.S. manufacturing
JEL: 
F14
J31
J71
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
369.11 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.