Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/23969
Authors: 
Jacobebbinghaus, Peter
Steiner, Viktor
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
ZEW Discussion Papers 03-33
Abstract: 
Social assistance and unemployment assistance, which provide means tested income support (social welfare) without pre-specified time limits, are viewed as one important reason for the persistently high level of unemployment in Germany by many economists. In order to increase work incentives and, at the same time, reduce social expenditures there have been various proposals to reform social welfare in the recent German policy debate. We analyse a specific reform proposal with the following components: (i) an integration of unemployment assistance and social assistance; (ii) a substantial reduction of the social assistance level for ?employable? persons who choose not to work; (iii) improved incentives to take up work by a combination of a reduction of the social assistance withdrawal rate and an earnings-related tax credit. The expected employment and fiscal effects of this welfare reform proposal are simulated on the basis of an econometrically estimated partialequilibrium labour supply/demand model embedded in a detailed tax-benefit microsimulation model. We find that the reductions in net social expenditures may be substantial, although the expected labour supply and employment effects of this reform are much smaller than is typically assumed by contributors to recent discussions on the potential labour market effects of welfare reforms in Germany. Furthermore, these employment gains come at the cost of a substantial expansion of public-works jobs.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
561.07 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.