Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/238645
Authors: 
Hallaq, Sameh
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper No. 955
Publisher: 
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Abstract: 
Immigration and Work Schedules: Theory and EvidenceOver the 1948-2013 period, many factors significantly impacted on human capital, which in turn affected economic growth in the United States. This chapter analyzes these factors within a complete national income accounting system which integrates Jorgenson-Fraumeni human capital into the accounts. By including human capital, a fresh perspective on economic growth across time and within specific subperiods is revealed, notably regarding the 1995-2000 and 2007-2009 periods. During the 1995-2000 period, the reduction in human capital investment significantly reduced apparent economic growth. In the 2007-2009 period, the increase in human capital investment tempered the negative impact of the Great Recession. Over the longer time period, first the post-World War baby boom and then the substantial increase in education led to higher economic growth than otherwise expected. As the pace of increase in education slowed and the workforce aged toward the end of the period, human capital induced growth was reduced.This study uses rich administrative and survey data to investigate the effects of class size on students' cognitive tests as well as bullying and violent behavior. I use the maximum class size rule to create a regression discontinuity (RD) relation between cohort enrollment size and class size in the public and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) school system in the West Bank. In addition, I provide evidence that there is no violation of the RD assumptions resulting from discontinuities in the relationship between enrollment and students' household background at cutoff points induced by a maximum class size rule. The main findings suggest that class size has no direct impact on students' cognitive skills except for those in grade six. However, class size reduction improves the quality of life for children by mitigating the bullying and violent behavior among pupils that may negatively affect their achievements. Finally, I point to peer relations and mental health problems as a potential mechanism through which class size affects children's self-reported bullying-victim instances and violent behavior.
Subjects: 
Class Size
Cognitive Abilities
Bullying
West Bank
JEL: 
I20
I12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
2.42 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.