Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/228367
Authors: 
Corgnet, Brice
Gächter, Simon
Hernán González, Roberto
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
CeDEx Discussion Paper Series No. 2020-03
Abstract: 
People are generally assumed to shy away from activities generating stochastic rewards, thus requiring extra compensation for handling any additional risk. In contrast with this view, neuroscience research with animals has shown that stochastic rewards may act as a powerful motivator. Applying these ideas to the study of work addiction in humans, and using a new experimental paradigm, we demonstrate how stochastic rewards may lead people to continue working on a repetitive and effortful task even after monetary compensation becomes saliently negligible. In line with our hypotheses, we show that persistence on the work task is especially pronounced when the entropy of stochastic rewards is high, which is also when the work task generates more stress to participants. We discuss the economic and managerial implications of our findings.
Subjects: 
Incentives
Work Addiction
Occupational Health
Experiments
JEL: 
C92
D87
D91
M54
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.