Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/173497
Authors: 
Kongar, Ebru
Price, Mark
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Levy Economics Institute 888
Abstract: 
Using data from the 2003-14 American Time Use Survey (ATUS), this paper examines the relationship between the state unemployment rate and the time that opposite-sex couples with children spend on childcare activities, and how this varies by the socioeconomic status (SES), race, and ethnicity of the mothers and fathers. The time that mothers and fathers spend providing primary and secondary child caregiving, solo time with children, and any time spent as a family are considered. To explore the impact of macroeconomic conditions on the amount of time parents spend with children, the time-use data are combined with the state unemployment rate data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. The analysis finds that the time parents spend on child-caregiving activities or with their children varies with the unemployment rate in low-SES households, African-American households, and Hispanic households. Given that job losses were disproportionately high for workers with no college degree, African-Americans, and Hispanics during the Great Recession, the results suggest that the burden of household adjustment during the crisis fell disproportionately on the households most affected by the recession.
Subjects: 
Economics of Gender
Time Use
Economic Crises
Unpaid Labor
JEL: 
D13
J16
J64
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
579.81 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.