Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/173047
Authors: 
Carson, Scott A.
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 6771
Abstract: 
When traditional measures for health and economic welfare are scarce or unreliable, height and the body mass index (BMI) are now well-accepted measures that reflect net nutrition during economic development. To date, there is no study that compares 19th century BMIs of immigrants and US natives. Individuals in the New South and West had high BMIs, while those in the upper South and Northeast had lower BMIs. Immigrants from Europe had the highest BMIs, while immigrants from Asia were the lowest. African-Americans and mixed-race individuals had greater BMIs than fairer complexioned whites. After accounting for occupational selection, workers in agricultural occupations had greater BMIs. Close proximity to rural agriculture decreased the relative price of food, increased net nutrition, and was associated with higher BMIs.
Subjects: 
nineteenth century US health
immigrant health
BMI
malnourishment
obesity
JEL: 
I12
I31
J70
N31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.