Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/148567
Authors: 
Dargnies, Marie-Pierre
Hakimov, Rustamdjan
Kübler, Dorothea
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
WZB Discussion Paper SP II 2016-210
Abstract: 
We document experimentally how biased self-assessments affect the outcome of matching markets. In the experiments, we exogenously manipulate the self-confidence of participants regarding their relative performance by employing hard and easy real-effort tasks. We give participants the option to accept early offers when information about their performance has not been revealed, or to wait for the assortative matching based on their actual relative performance. Early offers are accepted more often when the task is hard than when it is easy. We show that the treatment effect works through a shift in beliefs, i.e., underconfident agents are more likely to accept early offers than overconfident agents. The experiment identifies a behavioral determinant of unraveling, namely biased self-assessments, which can lead to penalties for underconfident individuals as well as efficiency losses.
Subjects: 
market unraveling
experiment
self-confidence
matching markets
JEL: 
C92
D47
D83
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.