Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/128405
Authors: 
Cunningham, Tom
de Quidt, Jonathan
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 5704
Abstract: 
A longstanding distinction in psychology is between implicit and explicit preferences. Implicit preferences are ordinarily measured by observing non-choice data, such as response time. In this paper we introduce a method for inferring implicit preferences directly from choices. The necessary assumption is that implicit preferences toward an attribute (e.g. gender, race, sugar) have a stronger effect when the attribute is mixed with others, and so the decision becomes less “revealing” about one’s preferences. We discuss reasons why preferences would have this property, advantages and disadvantages of this method relative to other measures of implicit preferences, and application to measuring implicit preferences in racial discrimination, self-control, and framing effects.
Subjects: 
implicit discrimination
bias
judgement and decision making
choice-set effects
JEL: 
D03
D83
J71
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.