Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/123200
Authors: 
Carson, Scott A.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 5571
Abstract: 
When traditional methods for measuring economic welfare are scarce or unreliable, heights and BMIs are now well accepted measurements that represent biological conditions during economic development. Weight, after controlling for height, is an alternative measure to BMI for current net nutrition. Little is known about how weights varied among Mexicans living in the 19th century American West. Between 1870 and 1920, average Mexican weight decreased slightly. Mexican farmers had the heaviest weights, and unskilled worker weights were low. For combined characteristics, weight varied the most with height and age, two uncontrollable characteristics, indicating that 19th century Mexican current net nutrition varied the most with factors over which individuals of Mexican descent had no control.
Subjects: 
anthropometrics
nineteenth century US weights
net nutrition
health
JEL: 
I10
J11
J15
N00
N31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.