Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/103652
Authors: 
Reilly, Benjamin
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
GIGA Working Papers 257
Abstract: 
Executive power sharing has been practiced widely in the Asia-Pacific region, in both formal and informal ways. This paper examines the theory and practice of these various approaches to the sharing or dividing of governing power across the region. I look first at the broad issues of executive structure and the distinction between presidential and parliamentary systems across the region, at the divergent approaches taken to both formal and informal practices of executive inclusion, and at the empirical relationship between these variables and broader goals of political stability. Following this, I construct an "index of power sharing" to compare the horizontal sharing of powers across the region over time. Finally, I look at the experience of vertical power sharing via measures such as federalism, devolution, and autonomy.
Subjects: 
power sharing
ethnicity
parties
elections
Asia
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
512.09 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.