Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/57008
Authors: 
Felipe, Jesus
McCombie, John
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Working paper, Levy Economics Institute 643
Abstract: 
Since the early 1990s, the number of papers estimating econometric models and using other quantitative techniques to try to understand different aspects of the Chinese economy has mushroomed. A common feature of some of these studies is the use of neoclassical theory as the underpinning for the empirical implementations. It is often assumed that factor markets are competitive, that firms are profit maximizers, and that these firms respond to the same incentives that firms in market economies do. Many researchers find that the Chinese economy can be well explained using the tools of neoclassical theory. In this paper, we (1) review two examples of estimation of the rate of technical progress, and (2) discuss one attempt at modeling investment. We identify their shortcomings and the problems with the alleged policy implications derived. We show that econometric estimation of neoclassical models may result in apparently sensible results for misinformed reasons. We conclude that modeling the Chinese economy requires a deeper understanding of its inner workings as both a transitional and a developing economy.
Subjects: 
China
identity
investment
neoclassical model
total factor productivity growth
JEL: 
C20
E22
E62
O23
P41
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
334.88 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.