Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/98898
Authors: 
Baillon, Aurélien
Koellinger, Philipp
Treffers, Theresa
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 14-044/I
Abstract: 
Many important decisions are made without precise information about the probabilities of the outcomes. In such situations, individual ambiguity attitudes influence decision making. The present study identifies affective states as a transient cause of ambiguity attitudes. We conducted two random-assignment, incentive-compatible laboratory experiments, varying subjects’ affective states. We find that sadness induces choices that are closer to ambiguity-neutral attitudes compared with the joy, fear, and control groups, where decision makers deviate more from payoff-maximizing behaviors and are more susceptible to likelihood insensitivity. We also find a similar pattern in a representative population sample where cloudy weather conditions on the day of the survey - a proxy for sad affect - correlate with more ambiguity-neutral attitudes. Our results may help explain re al-world phenomena such as financial markets that react to regular fluctuations in weather conditions.
Subjects: 
Ambiguity attitude
affect
joy
fear
sadness
weather
experiment.
JEL: 
D03
D81
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
370.96 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.