Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/98381
Authors: 
Aromolaran, Adebayo B.
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Center Discussion Paper 879
Abstract: 
Economists have argued that increasing female schooling positively influences the labor supply of married women by inducing a faster rise in market productivity relative to non-market productivity. I use the Nigerian Labor Force Survey to investigate how own and husband's schooling affect women's labor market participation. I find that additional years of postsecondary education increases wage market participation probability by as much as 15.2%. A marginal increase in primary schooling has no effect on probability of wage employment, but could enhance participation rates in self-employment by about 5.40%. These effects are likely to be stronger when a woman is married to a more educated spouse. The results suggest that primary education is more productive in non-wage work relative to wage work, while postsecondary education is more productive in wage work. Finally, I find evidence suggesting that non-market work may not be a normal good for married women in Nigeria.
Subjects: 
Nigeria
Female Schooling
Women's Labor Market Participation
Non-Market Productivity
JEL: 
I21
J22
J24
O15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
303.38 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.