Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/93303
Authors: 
Heckman, James J.
Mosso, Stefano
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 8000
Abstract: 
This paper distills and extends recent research on the economics of human development and social mobility. It summarizes the evidence from diverse literatures on the importance of early life conditions in shaping multiple life skills and the evidence on critical and sensitive investment periods for shaping different skills. It presents economic models that rationalize the evidence and unify the treatment effect and family influence literatures. The evidence on the empirical and policy importance of credit constraints in forming skills is examined. There is little support for the claim that untargeted income transfer policies to poor families significantly boost child outcomes. Mentoring, parenting, and attachment are essential features of successful families and interventions to shape skills at all stages of childhood. The next wave of family studies will better capture the active role of the emerging autonomous child in learning and responding to the actions of parents, mentors and teachers.
Subjects: 
capacities
dynamic complementarity
parenting
scaffolding
attachment
credit constraints
JEL: 
J13
I20
I24
I28
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
2.39 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.