Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Koch, Andreas
Pastuh, Daniel
Späth, Jochen
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IAW-Diskussionspapiere 97
The present contribution examines whether and how young firms and incumbents differ with regard to selected aspects of work forms and work organization in order to assess their roles for the qualitative changes of work in industrialized countries. Conceptually, we emanate from the approach of negotiated order and we empirically ground our research upon guided interviews conducted with employers and employees in about 50 firms in four distinct industries in Germany. According to our results, new forms of work are particularly widespread in new firms. Most of the young companies in our sample practice autonomous work forms like working on one's own responsibility and team working more frequently than incumbents, they are more prone to revert to functional flexibility (e.g. changing tasks and duties) and their working time arrangements tend to be more flexible. Altogether, firm age turns out to be an important parameter of new work forms and organization, though it is not the only one. Our results show that also the general and industry-specific framework conditions, a firm's internal characteristics (e.g. innovation intensity, hierarchies and routines), the relevant actors (management, workforce) and particularly the coaction of these elements are important drivers shaping the overall feature of a firm.
Young firms
Negotiated Order
Quality of Work
Working Time
Work Organization
Guided Interviews
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
568.42 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.