Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/92660
Authors: 
Yamane, Shoko
Yoneda, Hiroyasu
Tsutsui, Yoshiro
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
ISER Discussion Paper, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University 844
Abstract: 
This paper investigates the individual outcomes of irrational thinking, including paranormality and non-scientific thinking. These modes of thinking are identified by factor analysis from a 2008 survey. Income and happiness are used as measures of performance. Empirical results reveal that non-scientific thinking lowers income, whereas paranormality does not affect it. While non-scientific thinking lowers happiness, paranormality raises it. Extending the model, we find that higher ability and self-control result in higher income and happiness. Selfishness raises income, but diminishes happiness. These results suggest that Homo economicus generally achieves higher individual performance, except that belief in paranormality raises happiness.
Subjects: 
paranormality
non-scientific thinking
irrationality
happiness
factor analysis
Homo economicus
JEL: 
D03
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
230.71 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.