Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/90009
Authors: 
Layard, Richard
Clark, Andrew E.
Cornaglia, Francesca
Powdthavee, Nattavudh
Vernoit, James
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7682
Abstract: 
If policy-makers care about well-being, they need a recursive model of how adult life-satisfaction is predicted by childhood influences, acting both directly and (indirectly) through adult circumstances. We estimate such a model using the British Cohort Study (1970). The most powerful childhood predictor of adult life-satisfaction is the child's emotional health. Next comes the child's conduct. The least powerful predictor is the child's intellectual development. This has obvious implications for educational policy. Among adult circumstances, family income accounts for only 0.5% of the variance of life-satisfaction. Mental and physical health are much more important.
Subjects: 
conduct
emotional health
life-course
model
intervention
life-satisfaction
well-being
intellectual performance
success
JEL: 
A12
D60
H00
I31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.07 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.