Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Mansour, Hani
McKinnish, Terra
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7848
Economists have previously suggested that gains from marriage can be generated by complementarities in production (gains from specialization and exchange) or by complementarities in consumption (gains from joint consumption of household public goods and joint time consumption). This paper uses the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) from 2003-2011 to test whether couples that engage in less specialization (are more similar in hours of market work) spend more time together. We find that among married couples without young children, those with a greater difference in weekly hours of work between husband and wife spend less time together on non-working weekend days. Importantly, we find that this relationship is quite symmetric between couples in which the husband works greater hours and couples in which the wife works greater hours. We do not find evidence of a relationship between specialization and couple time together among couples with young children.
time use
home production
joint consumption
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
172.15 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.