Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/89883
Authors: 
Pugatch, Todd
Schroeder, Elizabeth
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7723
Abstract: 
We evaluate the impact of the Gambian hardship allowance, which provides a salary premium of 30-40% to primary school teachers in remote locations, on the distribution and characteristics of teachers across schools. A geographic discontinuity in the policy's implementation and the presence of common pre-treatment trends between hardship and non-hardship schools provide sources of identifying variation. We find that the hardship allowance increased the share of qualified (certified) teachers by 10 percentage points. The policy also reduced the pupil-qualified teacher ratio by 27, or 61% of the mean, in recipient schools close to the distance threshold. Further analysis suggests that these gains were not merely the result of teachers switching from non-hardship to hardship schools. With similar policies in place in more than two dozen other developing countries, our study provides an important piece of evidence on their effectiveness.
Subjects: 
teacher labor markets
rural schools
Gambia
program evaluation
regression discontinuity
JEL: 
I25
I28
J38
J45
J61
O12
O15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
812.37 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.