Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/89863
Authors: 
Winters, John V.
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7830
Abstract: 
Previous research suggests that the local stock of human capital creates positive externalities within local labor markets and plays an important role in regional economic development. However, there is still considerable uncertainty over what types of human capital are most important. Both national and local policymakers in the U.S. have called for efforts to increase the stock of college graduates in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, but data availability has thus far prevented researchers from directly connecting STEM education to human capital externalities. This paper uses the 2009-2011 American Community Survey to examine the external effects of college graduates in STEM and non-STEM fields on the wages of other workers in the same metropolitan area. I find that both types of college graduates create positive wage externalities, but STEM graduates create much larger externalities.
Subjects: 
human capital externalities
STEM
wage growth
agglomeration
JEL: 
J24
R23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
713.88 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.