Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/86045
Authors: 
Teulings, Coen N.
Gautier, P.A.
Year of Publication: 
2002
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 02-061/3
Abstract: 
We develop a model of an economy with several regions, which differ in scale. Within each region, workers have to search for a job-type that matches their skill. They face a trade-off between match quality and the cost of extended search. This trade-off differs between regions, because search is more efficient in larger regions. Then, interregional mobility and trade lead to a pattern of specialization where large scale regions have a comparative advantage in producing commodities that are search intensive, i.e. that require a wide variety of tasks and make use of scarce worker types. Empirical evidence for the United States is consistent with the implications of the model. Search can explain about two thirds of the wage differentials between large metropoles and small cities.
Subjects: 
Search
Cities
Assignment
Trade
JEL: 
J24
J31
J64
R12
R23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
778.63 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.