Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/82759
Authors: 
Ohlsson, Henry
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Uppsala University 2007:23
Abstract: 
This paper has two objectives. The first is to study the revenue from the gift, inheritance, and estate taxes in Sweden during more than a century. The second is to focus on a unique episode during the second half of the 1940s when gifts and gift tax revenue exploded. This episode has never before been discussed in the research literature. It gives an extremely clear illustration of behavioral response to taxes in general, and the impact of expectations of future tax increases in particular. It is also a very interesting episode in the economic history of Sweden. I have access to aggregate tax revenue data since 1884. Moreover, I have constructed a rich micro data set of all gifts reported during the period 1942–1949 in one county. A first main result is that gift tax revenue during the 1940s started to increase long before a new estate tax and increased wealth taxation were decided and implemented. The increase even began before the legislative process started. Second, both the number and the average values of gifts increased. Promissory notes were, in value, the most common way to give. Finally, gifts, inheritances, and estates were never important sources of tax revenue. Revenue as a share of GDP reached a peak already in the 1930s. The role of these taxes has instead primarily been equity and to provide integrity for other tax bases.
Subjects: 
gift tax
inheritance tax
estate tax
tax avoidance
expectations
JEL: 
D10
D31
H24
N33
N34
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
383.65 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.