Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/73982
Authors: 
Alberini, Anna
Lichtenberg, Erik
Mancini, Dominic
Galinato, Gregmar I.
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
Nota di Lavoro, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei 104.2005
Abstract: 
We use FDA’s seafood inspection records to examine: (i) how FDA has targeted its inspections under HACCP regulation; (ii) the effects of FDA inspections on compliance with both HACCP and plant sanitation standards; and (iii) the relationship between HACCP regulations and pre-existing sanitation standards. We use a theoretical model of enforcement to derive hypotheses about FDA’s targeting of inspections and firms’ patterns of compliance. We test those hypotheses using econometric models of inspection and compliance. Contrary to the predictions of the theoretical model and to FDA’s own stated policies, FDA does not seem to have targeted inspections based on product risk or past compliance performance. Firms’ compliance strategies seemed to be broadly in accord with the predictions of the theoretical model. The threat of inspection increased the likelihood of compliance, although the deterrent effect was statistically significant for sanitation standards but not for HACCP. Firms tend to persist in compliance status, especially with respect to sanitation standards. Contrary to FDA’s presupposition, however, HACCP compliance does not improve compliance with sanitation standards, suggesting that the two are not complementary.
Subjects: 
HACCP
Food safety
Seafood
Enforcement
Regulatory compliance
Regulation
JEL: 
I18
K32
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.