Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/72115
Authors: 
Véron, Nicolas
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Bruegel Policy Contribution 2011/14
Abstract: 
Credit rating agencies have been under the spotlight since the beginning of the current financial crisis. They failed in their assessment of US residential mortgage- based securities in the mid-2000s. Nevertheless, investors generally consider credit ratings useful to help form their views on credit risks. The global market for credit ratings is very concentrated, ostensibly as a consequence of high natural barriers to entry. All three leading rating agencies have headquarter functions in the US, but there is no compelling evidence that this has created an analytical bias. Tighter regulation of rating agencies can be envisaged but is unlikely to have a material positive effect on ratings quality. Better standardised public disclosures on risk factors by issuers are the most promising avenue for future improvements in credit risk assessments.
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
106.16 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.