Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/69518
Authors: 
Schüller, Simone
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 534
Abstract: 
The major event of the 9/11 terror attacks is likely to have induced an increase in anti-immigrant and anti-foreigner sentiments, not only among US residents but also beyond US borders. Using longitudinal data from the German Socio-Economic Panel and exploiting exogenous variation in interview timing throughout 2001, I find that the terror attacks in the US caused an immediate shift of around 40 percent of one within standard deviation to more negative attitudes toward immigration and resulted in a considerable decrease in concerns over xenophobic hostility among the German population. Furthermore, in exploiting within-individual variation this quasi-experiment provides evidence on the role of education inmoderating the negative terrorism shock.
Subjects: 
immigration
attitudes
education
September 11
terrorism
JEL: 
F22
I21
J61
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
345.35 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.