Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/69483
Authors: 
Fehrler, Sebastian
Przepiorka, Wojtek
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 7148
Abstract: 
It has been shown that psychological predispositions to benefit others can motivate human cooperation and the evolution of such social preferences can be explained with kin or multi-level selection models. It has also been shown that cooperation can evolve as a costly signal of an unobservable quality that makes a person more attractive with regard to other types of social interactions. Here we show that if a proportion of individuals with social preferences is maintained in the population through kin or multi-level selection, cooperative acts that are truly altruistic can be a costly signal of social preferences and make altruistic individuals more trustworthy interaction partners in social exchange. In a computerized laboratory experiment, we test whether altruistic behavior in the form of charitable giving is indeed correlated with trustworthiness and whether a charitable donation increases the observing agents' trust in the donor. Our results support these hypotheses and show that, apart from trust, responses to altruistic acts can have a rewarding or outcome-equalizing purpose. Our findings corroborate that the signaling benefits of altruistic acts that accrue in social exchange can ease the conditions for the evolution of social preferences.
Subjects: 
altruism
evolution of cooperation
costly signaling
social preferences
trust
trustworthiness
JEL: 
C72
C92
H41
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
674.83 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.