Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/53873
Authors: 
Dib, Ali
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Bank of Canada Working Paper 2010,24
Abstract: 
The author proposes a micro-founded framework that incorporates an active banking sector into a dynamic stochastic general-equilibrium model with a financial accelerator. He evaluates the role of the banking sector in the transmission and propagation of the real effects of aggregate shocks, and assesses the importance of financial shocks in U.S. business cycle fluctuations. The banking sector consists of two types of profitmaximizing banks that offer different banking services and transact in an interbank market. Loans are produced using interbank borrowing and bank capital subject to a regulatory capital requirement. Banks have monopoly power, set nominal deposit and prime lending rates, choose their leverage ratio and their portfolio composition, and can endogenously default on a fraction of their interbank borrowing. Because it is costly to raise capital to satisfy the regulatory capital requirement, the banking sector attenuates the real effects of financial shocks, reduces macroeconomic volatilities, and helps stabilize the economy. The model also includes two unconventional monetary policies (quantitative and qualitative easing) that reduce the negative impacts of financial crises.
Subjects: 
Economic models
Business fluctuations and cycles
Credit and credit aggregates
Financial stability
JEL: 
E32
E44
G1
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
401.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.