Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51687
Authors: 
Løken, Katrine V.
Lommerud, Kjell Erik
Lundberg, Shelly
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5685
Abstract: 
Norwegian registry data is used to investigate the location decisions of a full population cohort of young adults as they complete their education, establish separate households and form their own families. We find that the labor market opportunities and family ties of both partners affect these location choices. Surprisingly, married men live significantly closer to their own parents than do married women, even if they have children, and this difference cannot be explained by differences in observed characteristics. The principal source of excess female distance from parents in this population is the relatively low mobility of men without a college degree, particularly in rural areas. Despite evidence that intergenerational resource flows, such as childcare and eldercare, are particularly important between women and their parents, the family connections of husbands appear to dominate the location decisions of less-educated married couples.
Subjects: 
intergenerational proximity
marriage
location decisions
JEL: 
J12
J16
J61
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
923.38 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.