Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51637
Authors: 
Falck, Oliver
Heblich, Stephan
Link, Susanne
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5829
Abstract: 
Armed conflicts, natural disasters and infrastructure projects continue to force millions into migration. This is especially true for developing countries. After World War II, about 8 million ethnic Germans experienced a similar situation when forced to leave their homelands and settle within the new borders of West Germany. Subsequently, a law was introduced to foster their labor market integration. We evaluate the success of this law using unique retrospective individual-level panel data. We find that the law improved expellees' overall situation but failed to restore their pre-war occupation status. This holds implications for the design of integration policies today.
Subjects: 
forced migration
integration policy
difference-in-differences
Germany
JEL: 
N30
J61
D04
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
733.96 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.