Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/44206
Authors: 
Gevrek, Deniz
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5061
Abstract: 
This paper explores the relationship between anti-miscegenation laws, interracial marriage and black males' geographical distribution in the U.S. during and after the Great Migration. The U.S. Supreme Court decision in the case of Loving v. Virginia in 1967, which forced the last 16 Southern states to strike down their anti-miscegenation laws, creates a unique opportunity to explore the impact of an exogenous change in a state's laws regulating interracial marriages. Analyzing the U.S. Census data, I find that anti-miscegenation laws in an individual's state of birth affect the sorting of inter- and intraracially married black males into destination states differentially.
Subjects: 
interracial marriage
migration
anti-miscegenation laws
JEL: 
J12
J15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
243.26 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.