Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35712
Authors: 
Becker, Sascha O.
Wößmann, Ludger
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 3837
Abstract: 
Martin Luther urged each town to have a girls' school so that girls would learn to read the Gospel, evoking a surge of building girls' schools in Protestant areas. Using county- and town-level data from the first Prussian census of 1816, we show that a larger share of Protestants decreased the gender gap in basic education. This result holds when using only the exogenous variation in Protestantism due to a county's or town's distance to Wittenberg, the birthplace of the Reformation. Similar results are found for the gender gap in literacy among the adult population in 1871.
Subjects: 
Gender gap
education
Protestantism
JEL: 
I21
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
357.98 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.