Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35708
Authors: 
O'Donoghue, Cathal
Meredith, David
O'Shea, Eamon
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 4192
Abstract: 
As in many other developed countries, Ireland in recent decades has experienced a postponement of maternity. In this paper we consider the main trends in this phenomenon, considering changes in first and later births separately. We adapt the theoretical model due to Walker (1995) to incorporate a declining marginal return to experience to provide a human capital/career planning explanation for this postponement. We estimate a hazard model based upon the 1994 Living in Ireland Survey to empirically test this model. The career-planning hypothesis was found to hold. However an assumption about perfect capital markets failed indicating the impact of an income effect on the timing of maternity. The model also identified the importance of cohort differences in the timing of marriage in explaining much of the inter-cohort specific differences in the timing of maternity.
Subjects: 
Labour markets
fertility
JEL: 
J13
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
530.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.