Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Arulampalam, Wiji
Naylor, Robin A.
Smith, Jeremy P.
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 3749
We exploit a rich administrative panel data-set for cohorts of Economics students at a UK university in order to identify causal effects of class absence on student performance. We utilise the panel properties of the data to control for unobserved heterogeneity across students and hence for endogeneity between absence and academic performance of students stemming from the likely influence of unobserved effort and ability on both absence and performance. Our estimations also exploit features of the data such as the random assignment of students to classes and information on the timetable of classes, which yield potential instruments in our identification strategy. Among other results, we find that there is a causal effect of absence on performance for students: missing class leads to poorer performance. There is evidence from a quantile regression specification that this is particularly true for better-performing students, consistent with our hypothesis that effects of absence on performance are likely to vary with factors such as student ability.
Randomised experiments
quantile regression
selection correction
panel data
student performance
class absence
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
323.03 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.