Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35343
Authors: 
Kahanec, Martin
Zimmermann, Klaus F.
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 3913
Abstract: 
The 2004 and 2007 enlargements of the European Union were unprecedented in a number of economic and policy aspects. This essay provides a broad and in-depth account of the effects of the post-enlargement migration flows on the receiving as well as sending countries in three broader areas: labour markets, welfare systems, and growth and competitiveness. Our analysis of the available literature and empirical evidence shows that (i) EU enlargement had a significant impact on migration flows from new to old member states, (ii) restrictions applied in some of the countries did not stop migrants from coming but changed the composition of the immigrants, (iii) any negative effects in the labour market on wages or employment are hard to detect, (iv) post-enlargement migration contributes to growth prospects of the EU, (v) these immigrants are strongly attached to the labour market, and (vi) they are quite unlikely to be among welfare recipients. These findings point out the difficulties that restrictions on the free movement of workers bring about.
Subjects: 
Migration
migration effects
EU Eastern enlargement
free movement of workers
JEL: 
F22
J15
J61
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
366.96 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.