Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34429
Authors: 
Pollak, Robert A.
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 3109
Abstract: 
Does joint taxation disadvantage women? To answer that question, this paper begins by reviewing unitary and bargaining models of intrafamily allocation, and then discusses the determinants of bargaining power in a world without taxes. It argues that wage rates rather than earnings are determinants of bargaining power, and then argues that productivity in household production is also a source of bargaining power. In the absence of human capital effects, joint taxation does not appear to disadvantage women in either divorce threat or separate spheres bargaining. Hence, the claim that joint taxation disadvantages women, if it is correct, depends on effects that operate through the incentives to accumulate human capital. But a satisfactory analysis of the effects of taxation on human capital awaits the further development of dynamic models of family bargaining.
Subjects: 
Joint taxation
family bargaining
household production
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
138.73 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.