Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/33723
Authors: 
Makepeace, Gerald
Pal, Sarmistha
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 2390
Abstract: 
Given the intrinsically sequential nature of child birth, timing of a child's birth has consequences not only for itself, but also for its older and younger siblings. The paper argues that prior and posterior spacing between consecutive siblings are thus important measures of intensity of sibling competition for limited parental resources. While the available estimates of child mortality tend to ignore the endogeneity of sibling composition, we use a correlated recursive model of prior and posterior spacing and child mortality to correct it. There is evidence that uncorrected estimates underestimate the effects of prior and posterior spacing on child mortality.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
238.41 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.