Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Kuhn, Peter
Lozano, Fernando Antonio
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 1924
After declining for most of the century, the share of employed American men regularly working more than 50 hours per week began to increase around 1970. This trend has been especially pronounced among highly educated, high-wage, salaried, and older men. Using two decades of CPS data, we rule out a number of factors, including business cycles, changes in observed labor force characteristics, and changes in the level of men's real hourly earnings as primary explanations of this trend. Instead we argue that increases in salaried men's marginal incentives to supply hours beyond 40 accounted for the recent rise. Since these increases were accompanied by a rough constancy in real earnings at 40 hours, they can be interpreted as a compensated wage increase.
labor supply
work hours
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
440.47 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.