Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/25091
Authors: 
Geppert, Kurt
Gornig, Martin
Werwatz, Axel
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
SFB 649 discussion paper 2006,008
Abstract: 
The vast majority of regions in West Germany, and the EU, have become more similar in terms of per-capita income and productivity between 1980 and 2000. But a number of rich areas - generally large agglomerations - have succeeded in departing from this trend of convergence. They are continuing to rise above the average productivity level. We examine whether this development can also be seen as due to changes in the spatial distribution of economic sectors. Knowledge-intensive services in particular are identified as industries that combine employment growth and further geographical concentration. Logistical and nonparametric regressions confirm a positive relation between the regional weight of sectors that are continuing to concentrate geographically and the probability that this region will develop ahead of the general trend. We find that increasing localisation of fast growing industries is an important factor behind the changes in the spatial pattern of the economy.
Subjects: 
regional convergence
knowledge-intensive services
industry-specific local linkages
logistical regressions
non-parametric regressions
JEL: 
C14
C16
R12
R30
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
308.26 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.