Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/224937
Authors: 
Cartwright, Madison
Year of Publication: 
2020
Citation: 
[Journal:] Internet Policy Review [ISSN:] 2197-6775 [Volume:] 9 [Year:] 2020 [Issue:] 3 [Pages:] 1-18
Abstract: 
This article argues that the United States (US) has been able to exploit the international market dominance of US-based internet companies in order to internationalise state power through surveillance programmes conducted by national security and law enforcement agencies. The article also examines the emerging threat to the US from China, which is attempting to establish 'geo-economic space' for its own internet and technology companies. As Chinese companies become more competitive, they threaten both the commercial dominance of US companies as well as the geopolitical power of the US state. Furthermore, the US has concerns that the entrance of Chinese companies into its own market, specifically Huawei, could make it susceptible to the 'internationalised' power of China - such as Chinese state surveillance. In response, the US has sought to shrink the 'geo-economic space' available to Huawei by using its firms, such as Google, to disrupt Huawei's supply chains.
Subjects: 
Surveillance
Huawei
Geopolitics
State power
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/legalcode
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
301.84 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.