Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/220059
Authors: 
Gradus, Raymond
Dijkgraaf, Elbert
Budding, Tjerk
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper No. TI 2020-022/V
Abstract: 
Exploring the outcome of Dutch municipal elections between 1998 and 2018, this paper finds two dominant trends: increasing political fragmentation and localism. When explaining localism, the number of inhabitants, regional diversity and the election year dummies are significant. The last result gives some indication for a welfare hypothesis as a large decentralisation of Dutch social policy took place in 2007 and 2015. Some evidence is found for a merger effect of more or less equal municipalities. There is evidence as well that more fragmentation in the municipal council leads to more aldermen. The number of aldermen is also depending on the number of inhabitants and a merger effect in case of two municipalities.
Subjects: 
local elections
political fragmentation
localism
empirical research
JEL: 
H76
D72
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
918.11 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.