Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/220027
Authors: 
Baillon, Aurélien
Capuno, Joseph
O'Donnell, Owen
Tan, Carlos
van Wilgenburg, Kim
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper No. TI 2019-078/V
Publisher: 
Tinbergen Institute, Amsterdam and Rotterdam
Abstract: 
Temporary incentives are offered in anticipation of persistent effects, but these are seldom estimated. We use a nationwide randomized experiment in the Philippines to estimate effects three years after the withdrawal of two incentives for health insurance. A premium subsidy had a persistent effect on enrollment that is more than four fifths of the immediate effect. Application assistance had a much larger immediate impact, but less than a fifth of this effect persisted. The subsidy persuaded those with higher initial willingness to pay to enroll and keep enrolling, while application assistance achieved a larger immediate effect by drawing in those who valued insurance less and were less likely to re-enroll.
Subjects: 
incentives
persistence
health insurance
subsidy
randomized experiment
JEL: 
I13
C93
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.1 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.