Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/216865
Authors: 
Ul Hassan, Masood
Naz, Anjum
Year of Publication: 
2020
Citation: 
[Journal:] Pakistan Journal of Commerce and Social Sciences (PJCSS) [ISSN:] 2309-8619 [Volume:] 14 [Year:] 2020 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 63-98
Abstract: 
Within the patriarchal society of Pakistan, the current study has modeled one research question: Does university-based entrepreneurship education (EE) raise university students' self-employment attitudes and intention through nurturing their perceptions ofgender equality and empowering women? To address this question, the current study uses partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM), with the hypotheses grounded in the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs, 4&5) to provide the complementary explanations of the female students' intention to become self-employed. Based on reliable and valid constructs, the PLS structural model significantly explains about 54% of the variance in female students' intention tobecome self-employed.However, the most relevant result to be considered is the confirmation that female students' positive perceptions of gender equality can lead them to their perceptions of women empowerment. Likewise, through it, to attitudes about and intention to participate in self-employment Apart from its limitations, the current study presents some theoretical and practical implications in the Pakistani context. Particularly that through discussion and persuasion, entrepreneurial education-basedgendered supportive activities can reshape especially female students' gender attitudes and stereotypes. That, in turn, may enhance their self-employment career attitudes and intention
Subjects: 
entrepreneurship education
theory of planned behavior
gender equality and women empowerment
women entrepreneurs
education for women entrepreneurs
sustainable development goals
Pakistan
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
672.1 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.