Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/214004
Authors: 
Guadamuz, Andrés
Year of Publication: 
2016
Citation: 
[Journal:] Internet Policy Review [ISSN:] 2197-6775 [Volume:] 5 [Year:] 2016 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 1-12
Abstract: 
In 2011, a macaque monkey used a camera belonging to British photographer David Slater in Indonesia to take a self-portrait. The selfie picture became famous worldwide after it was published in the British media. In 2014 Slater sent a removal request to Wikimedia Commons, which indicated that the picture was in the public domain because it had been taken by the monkey and animals cannot own copyright works. While most of the legal analysis so far has been centred around US law, this article takes a completely different approach. Re-assessing jurisdictional issues, I examine the case from a UK and European perspective. The monkey selfie is of importance to internet policy: it has a lot to teach us about online jurisdiction. Under current originality rules, David Slater has a good copyright claim for ownership of the picture.
Subjects: 
Copyright
European law
Monkey
Selfie
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/legalcode
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.